Silverwind’s Past…

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Silverwind is a traveller and a merchant. His level of greed has varied from great to less to great again at times. Sometimes the cart has been overflowing, sometimes empty for months at a time. There is reward in knowledge and history which supersedes most material goods – but he does have a love for the finer things. The more he learned, and the more he travelled, the more attuned to the stories he became. As he became more attuned, he began to work the very fabric of these stories himself – changing the destinies of these people, and of late, of whole villages and one day, perhaps, whole regions. He works at the edge of the fabric, weaving the tales of the past into the cloth of the future.

Silverwind wandered a region known as the Kathivargh Mountains. The small villages were his realm of travelling and many of the people in these ‘toonah’ or villages, he called friends. Perhaps the most famous of these villages is Onata-Toonah, a large village peopled by great warriors and sturdy mountain women. They herd and harvest the meager bounty of the mountains. Lately, he had been travelling high in the distant and very wild parts of the mountains. He was most recently in a village called Nuku-toonah. This is a scrappy little collection of huts inhabited by a very rugged and even somewhat diminuative band of people. They hunt the wikapi, the small pig-like creatures, harvest the ponoto tubers and scrape out a living. One of their great talents is for mining and probing the high hills and caverns for precious stones. That is what Silverwind was trading for most recently. That is, until the D’Oktakar barbarians showed up with their priest-casters and their soldiers riding giant insectoid mounts. With them came a great darkening of the skies and some great evil on the air. They captured the residents of the village and took them, including Silverwind, to the distant ancient temple called, in their tongue, Onawa Alsoomse, or Tower Hill. It was once ago, in distant times, called the temple of light. They took him up there – bound and magically entranced by the caster-captors, to sacrifice, along with the villagers, to their dark god, Angun Nasomtaqua, the God of Darkness and Fear, or God of Shadow-Fear. Silverwind’s story in Dun Alden started with him as captive of the D’Oktakar soldiers and their warrior priests. They had a high priest called, Moona-Nasom, breath of darkness. He wore a great wikapi tooth necklace, and carried about him an aura of shadow.

Other geography familiar to Silverwind:

Agadeera Agadeen

Agadeera Agadeen, The Mogadeera

Near to the west, at the base of the mountains is the city state of Mogadore. There is a queen there, Mogadeera Agadeera Agadeen, who is a mighty sorceress and ruthless oligarch. To the south of Mogadore lie their mortal enemies, a dark skinned race of spider-god worshipping peoples called the Marghul-Toa. All of these peoples are dangerous and not to be trusted. The Marghul-Toa are evil and scary. The peoples of Mogadore, in their capital city of Mogasheeron, are a foul bunch. They drink urine, farm eels, and some practice necromancy and other dark arts. They worshipped a dark god, Methlaghalzhul, but recently Silverwind has heard that Methlaghalzuhl was defeated by Agadeera Agadeen and now she rules from the high throne of Vogasheeron (The Citadel).

Far to the east lies the legendary port and harbor of Samahdi Bay. One day, perhaps Silverwind will go there and learn the stories and tales of their past. To the west, across the deep grass plains, lay a few human realms. There is the empire of the Nabatoomians. They inhabit great rivers and their peoples wash upon the shores of a western mountain range whose name isn’t even known. The Nabatoomians fight with their enemies the Borgonians to the north and west. Far to the south and east, in a scorching desert, live the architect builders, the Tanarii in their cities of brass and copper. More directly south live the D’Oktakar, a race of savage beast-master barbarians.

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